Topic: Trademark

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Canadian Intellectual Property Office Further Extends Statutory Deadlines to June 1, 2020

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) has announced a further extension of deadlines to June 1, 2020. CIPO is working hard to continue operations as usual in these unforeseen circumstances. To ensure Canadian intellectual property owners do not have their rights compromised by the Covid-19 pandemic, CIPO has extended statutory deadlines that fall between March 16 … Continue reading

Canadian Intellectual Property Office further extends deadlines to May 18, 2020

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) announced today that it has further extended deadlines under the Patent Act, the Trademarks Act and the Industrial Design Act to May 18, 2020. While Canadian intellectual property owners should always consult with their professional advisors concerning specific deadlines, the general effect of CIPO’s designation means that deadlines falling … Continue reading

Court Suspensions Continue, with Some Exceptions

Please see our updated version of this article, published May 28, 2020. An Update on the Response from Canadian Courts to COVID-19 We are now more than a month in to social distancing measures, and it is time for an update on the status of the courts across Canada. As with the rest of us, … Continue reading

Could the use of Punitive Damages be the way forward in China?

In September 2019, the Shanghai Pudong District People’s Court awarded triple punitive damages to Balanced Body Inc., which according to the Shanghai government news report was the first such award for a Shanghai Court to a foreign plaintiff. Background Balanced Body is a provider of Pilates equipment and education and holds PRC trade mark registrations … Continue reading

Federal Court of Canada Extends Suspension Period to May 15, 2020

By Updated Practice Direction and Order dated April 4, 2020, the Federal Court has further extended the Suspension Period to May 15, 2020.  It has simultaneously mapped out a strategy to keep the Court running as efficiently as possible under the circumstances. During the Suspension Period (which began March 16, 2020 and currently runs until May … Continue reading

Canadian Federal Court of Appeal Extends Suspension of Hearings to May 15, 2020

In a Notice to the Parties and the Profession issued April 2, 2020, the Federal Court of Appeal has confirmed that the suspension period implemented on March 16, 2020 will be extended to Friday, May 15, 2020.  All matters scheduled to be heard during this Suspension Period are adjourned. The business of the Court will … Continue reading

Trademarks, Internet sales, and personal jurisdiction

On February 10, 2020, the Seventh Circuit federal appeals court ruled that an Illinois-based seller of dietary supplements could maintain a federal Lanham Act and Illinois state law claims against a California-based competitor that had only an online presence, and no physical presence in Illinois. (Curry v. Revolution Laboratories, LLC, 949 F,3d 385 (7th Cir. … Continue reading

UPDATE: Canadian Intellectual Property Office further extends all deadlines to May 1st

In response to the continuing disruption caused by the COVID-19 outbreak,  the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) has announced on March 27, 2020 a further extension for filing deadlines  – all deadlines ending in the month of April 2020 will automatically be extended to May 1, 2020. Parties in proceedings before the Trademarks Opposition Board should … Continue reading

Online Brand Management: Avoiding Toxic Social Influencers

Online brand protection must be taken into consideration, particularly when faced with changing consumer behavior, market uncertainty and rampant misinformation. Social influencers with large audiences that value their opinions on consumer products and health regimes are a valuable tool for companies and governments looking to reach large online communities quickly. However, some influencers have been … Continue reading

Response from Canadian Courts to COVID-19

Please see our updated version of this article, published May 28, 2020. We know you have a lot to think about and plan right now and over the next few weeks. You can rely on us to keep your intellectual property litigation matters  moving forward.  To that end, we wanted to provide an update on … Continue reading

UPDATE ON COVID-19 : CIPO announces extensions in wake of outbreak in Canada

Given the many challenges faced by all businesses in dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak, the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) has advised that it will relax filing deadlines for the remainder of March 2020.  This decision was first announced on March 16, 2020 and further updated yesterday, March 19, 2020. What you need to know All … Continue reading

Stranger than Sci-Fi Part 2: Should Artificial Intelligence machines be recognised as owners of IP?

IP legislation often finds itself struggling to plug gaps in the law caused by the rapid pace of technological change, and the state of the law surrounding ownership of AI-generated products is no different. In the first article of this series, we considered how current Australian patent and copyright law frameworks would deal with questions … Continue reading

USPTO adopts new communication and electronic filing requirements

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has published a new Examination Guide, enacting certain requirements that will go into effect this Saturday, February 15, 2020. Among the new requirements are two important changes. Most significantly, the USPTO will now require all new applications to list an email address for the applicant, even where the … Continue reading

My oh my Myanmar! 

The Myanmar government has recently flagged its intention to implement new trade mark laws commencing mid-2020. This is good news for global brand owners hoping for Myanmar’s laws to be better aligned to international trade mark standards. However, brand owners must take positive steps to ensure that their trade marks remain protected under the new … Continue reading

China update: Good news (with a warning) for brand owners outsourcing the manufacturing of their products in China

Global trade is currently a clear focus between nations around the world, and we are seeing trade agreement negotiations effecting world economies in an increasingly direct fashion. As IP specialists, we are always alive to the legal developments that fall out of these negotiations, particularly how they impact domestic laws in relation to balancing the … Continue reading

Are IP Australia costs awards set to finally reflect costs incurred? Proposed changes to trade mark hearing cost awards

In December 2019, after much anticipation, IP Australia released a draft of proposed amendments to the costs that may be awarded in relation to trade marks proceedings heard before IP Australia. IP Australia comments that these changes should ensure awards more accurately reflect the actual costs incurred by parties and are based on Federal Court … Continue reading

Focus on the reform of French trademark law following the transposition of the “Trademark Package”

Order n°2019-1169 of 13 November 2019 on goods and services marks, its implementing decree n°2019-1316 of 9 December 2019 and the Minister of the Economy and Finance and the Minister of Public Accounts decision of the same date on procedural fees of the French national institute of industrial property (INPI, the acronym for the original … Continue reading

The perilous legal protection of the shape of product

In its decision dated 24 October 2019 (Case T601/17, Rubik’s Brand/EUIPO – Simba Toys), the General Court of the European Union has confirmed the invalidity of the European Union’s three-dimensional trade mark “Rubik’s Cube”, which consists of the shape of the famous puzzle. The launch of a new product generally involves heavy investments (including marketing) … Continue reading

Authorised use or something fishy? – Implications for trade mark ‘use’ in Australia in the inter-company context

Trade mark licensing arrangements can often offer significant benefits for trade mark owners by increasing brand exposure and royalty revenue streams. However, as we have previously reported, recent Australian cases (such as Lodestar Anstalt v Campari America LLC [2016] FCAFC 92 (Lodestar)) demonstrated that licensing arrangements may expose trade mark owners to the risk of … Continue reading
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