Topic: Copyright

Subscribe to Copyright RSS feed

Recent developments for IPR protection in China

On November 5th 2018, at the inauguration ceremony of the first-ever China International Import Expo held in Shanghai, President Xi Jinping reassured investors, especially foreign enterprises, on the administration’s determination to protect their intellectual property rights in China. In the speech, President Xi announced that in order to significantly increase the cost of infringing IPR … Continue reading

Bill C-86 — significant changes to Canada’s IP regime

The federal government’s recent omnibus budget bill, Bill C-86 tabled October 29th, 2018, proposes significant changes to Canada’s IP laws. Division 7 of the Bill is intended to implement many aspects of the government’s IP strategy announced in April 2018, and targets the Patent Act, the Trade-marks Act, and Copyright Act; provides for a new … Continue reading

Wolverhampton Wanderers

Wolves bare their fangs over copyright infringement claim You’d think that newly promoted Wolverhampton Wanderers would have enough on their plate just ensuring survival in the Premiership. Unfortunately, the club now has another worry given that it has been sued in the intellectual property courts in London by an individual who claims copyright in the … Continue reading

Copyright, cryptocurrency and video games

Video games, such as Grand Theft Auto®, remain popular around the globe, and two recent matters made headlines on two different aspects of the games: copyright and cryptocurrency. Copyright On August 16, 2018, the federal trial court in Manhattan issued a ruling in a case involving the video game “Grand Theft Auto V” (“GTAV”) and … Continue reading

Amended Australian IP laws receive Royal Assent with little fanfare

On 24 August 2018, the creatively named Intellectual Property Laws Amendment (Productivity Commission Response Part 1 and Other Measures) Bill 2018 quietly received Royal Assent, with some parts of the new Act entering into force the following day. As the name indicates, the primary focus of the new legislation is to implement the recommendations made … Continue reading

Public laws, private standards and copyright “fair use”

On July 17, 2018, the federal appeals court located in Washington, D.C. issued a ruling in a case involving an intersection of copyrighted material (standards) and non-copyrightable material (laws and regulations). The appeals court remanded the matter back to the trial court, to determine under what circumstances a non-profit organization could publish private standards as … Continue reading

Trial Court ruling: game over Team Copyright

We had previously covered the March 22, 2017 U.S. Supreme Court copyright ruling on designs on cheerleader uniforms. In Star Athletica, L.L.C. v. Varsity Brands Inc., a majority of the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the two-dimensional designs on cheerleaders uniforms were at least in theory eligible for copyright protection. On August 10, 2017, seven … Continue reading

Get your IP game on: intellectual property protection and video games

The video game industry around the world and in Canada is booming. Not only does this market create new and varied forms of entertainment, it also creates jobs and generates staggering sales revenues. Industry statistics for the United States show sales of computer and video games having increased from $10.1 billion in 2009 to $24.5 … Continue reading

Promoting an innovation economy – Australian Government responds to Productivity Commission’s report into IP arrangements

We recently published an article on the potential impact on the Productivity Commission’s Inquiry Report on Intellectual Property Arrangements (Report) on Australia’s innovation economy. The Australian Government has now responded to the Report, supporting the Commission’s recommendations to reform the patent system, but stopping short of embracing the extensive copyright overhaul recommended in the Report, … Continue reading

US Copyright Office and electronic signatures

On May 18, 2017, the US Copyright Office proposed some regulatory changes in its requirement for a handwritten, wet signature in order to a record a document with the Copyright Office. The Copyright Office has proposed permitting electronic signatures in certain circumstances. Background In the US, the Copyright Office receives three types of documents for … Continue reading

Maximise your IP to enhance franchise value

Franchising is, in essence, a business model built on intellectual property (IP) – it provides a useful forum for commercialising IP.  Franchisors gain by sharing use of their IP (including trade marks, patents, designs, copyright materials, know-how and/or confidential information) in return for a fee, and franchisees benefit by obtaining the benefit of an established … Continue reading

Go Team Copyright!

On March 22, 2017, while millions of viewers were watching U.S. college basketball teams vie for the national championship, the uniforms worn by the cheerleaders became the focus of a U.S. Supreme Court copyright ruling. In Star Athletica, L.L.C. v. Varsity Brands Inc., a majority of the Supreme Court ruled that the two-dimensional designs on … Continue reading

Copyrightability of private standards in federal regulations

On February 2, 2017, a federal trial court judge in Washington, D.C. ruled, in a 55-page opinion, that private standards developing organizations (“SDOs”) do not lose their copyright or trademark protection if a federal regulation adopts their standards. Background This case, American Society for Testing and Materials v. Public.Resource.Org, Inc., Case. No. 13-cv-1215 (TSC) (D.D.C. … Continue reading

Who goes to Rio: Sports sponsorship and ambush marketing in Australia

The Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) is urging the public to support “true, valued Partners” after it lost its last minute bid to prevent ambush marketing ahead of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. Australian Olympic Committee, Inc. v. Telstra Corporation Limited [2016] FCA 857 (29 July 2016). The decision by the Federal Court of Australia highlights the … Continue reading

Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” victory rambles on to a ruling on attorneys’ fees

Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, and John Paul Jones—the remaining members of Led Zeppelin—along with several recording industry defendants, prevailed in federal court on June 23 in a copyright jury trial over the introduction of the band’s legendary song, “Stairway to Heaven.” The band had been accused of copying parts of the song “Taurus” by the … Continue reading

One simple hack to make your hackathon a greater success

Businesses across all industries are increasingly gathering dynamic and agile thinkers to brainstorm ideas at hackathon events.  These are short-duration, high-intensity think-tank sessions, aimed at solving problems or generating ideas to take the business to the next level, sometimes with prizes or bonuses awarded for the best ideas.  But there’s one important hack to use … Continue reading

Monkeys have no (copy)rights

Earlier this year, you may have seen the “monkey selfie” story in the news again, with the United States District Court ruling that a wild macaque cannot own copyright in the photos it took of itself using a camera left lying around. (The camera was owned by nature photographer David Slater.)  See Order, Naruto, et … Continue reading

DMCA exemption for 3D Printers (Part 6 of 6)

As we have reported, the sixth triennial rulemaking proceeding by the Librarian of Congress resulted in a wide range of DMCA exemptions. Today, in our final post, we cover a new exemption involving the use of 3D printers. 3D printing 101 3D printing technology allows users to convert digital data into physical objects. The 3D … Continue reading

DMCA Exemption – vehicle software (Part 5 of 6)

In the sixth triennial proceeding to determine Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”) exemptions, the Copyright Office adopted an exemption concerning the electronic control unit (“ECU”) software found in automobiles and agricultural vehicles. The new exemption permits owners to circumvent the technological control measures (TMPs) found in ECU software for the purpose of diagnosing, repairing, and … Continue reading

DMCA exemption for smart TVs (Part 4 of 6)

Today, in our multi-part series on DMCA exemptions, we cover a new exemption concerning “smart TVs”. In addition to the exemptions for jailbreaking devices such as smartphones and tablets that we described in Part 3, of our series, the Copyright Office has also added an exemption for jailbreaking smart TVs. The exemption is a limited … Continue reading
LexBlog