Mark Edward Davis (CA)

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Canadian Food and Beverage Industry Adopts Code for Advertising to Children

Through a coalition of four industry associations, the Canadian food and beverage industry has committed to a Code for the Responsible Advertising of Food and Beverage Products to Children (the “Food and Beverage Advertising Code”).  A Guide for the Code for the Responsible Advertising of Food and Beverage Products to Children (the “Guide”) has also … Continue reading

Proactive Trademark Registration Strategy Can Prevent Costly Customs Issues in China

Although it is not strictly necessary to file for a trade mark registration before using a mark, there are significant advantages to securing trademark protection, particularly in a company’s primary markets.  Amongst other benefits, a trademark registration gives the owner the exclusive right to use that mark in association with the goods and services covered … Continue reading

Amazon’s 2020 Brand Protection Report – What Brand Owners Need to Know

On May 10, 2021, Amazon released its 2020 Brand Protection Report (the Report), the first of its kind published by the e-commerce giant. The Report offers insight into Amazon’s brand protection approach and efforts over the past year, including proactive controls, brand tools, and consequences for “bad actors”. With a growing number of fraudsters cropping … Continue reading

Canadian Trademarks Office Takes Steps to Address Backlog

On May 3, 2021, the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) published two new practice notices: (1) Measures to improve timeliness in examination; and (2) Requests for expedited examination.  These notices outline CIPO’s plan to help clear its backlog of trademark applications, and to facilitate expedited review in particular circumstances.  CIPO’s practice notices operate as general … Continue reading

Expedited Examination for COVID-19 Related Marks Avoid Systemic Delays in Canadian Examination

The delays in Canadian trademark examination are becoming excruciating. The Trademarks Act and the Trademark Regulations provisions do not expressly provide for expedited examination of a Canadian trademark application. The long-standing practice of the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (“CIPO”) was to refuse requests for the expedited examination.  Section 2.2 of the Trademark Examination Manual, the … Continue reading

How the Canadian Trademarks Office Considers Inherent Distinctiveness

Inherent distinctiveness is a measure of a trademark’s originality – those elements that make a brand unique and recognizable to the public. Trademarks indicate the source of goods or services for consumers. As such, distinctiveness is said to be the “essence of a protectable trademark and the foundation of trademark law”[1]. Canada Now Examines for … Continue reading

Federal Court of Appeal Reviews Meaning of “Use” of a Trademark in Canada

In Miller Thomson LLP v Hilton Worldwide Holding LLP, 2020 FCA 134, the Canadian Federal Court of Appeal recently confirmed that a trademark associated with “hotel services” was valid despite no brick-and-mortar presence in Canada.  More specifically, the Court acknowledged that providing incidental or ancillary services to the registered service can be considered to be … Continue reading

Where the Rubber Hits the Road: Damages for Canadian E-Commerce Copyright Infringement

In Rallysport Direct LLC v 2424508 Ontario Ltd, 2020 FC 794, the Canadian Federal Court awarded $357,500 in statutory damages and $50,000 in punitive damages for infringement of copyright in 1,430 photographs. Background Rallysport Direct LLC (RSD) is a wholesaler and direct-to-consumer supplier of aftermarket automotive components and accessories. It sells its products on its … Continue reading

Grey Goods and False Labels: Federal Court Grants Interlocutory Injunction in a Trademark Case

In a recent trademark passing off case, TFI Foods Ltd. et al. v. Every Green International Inc., 2020 FC 808, the Canadian Federal Court granted an interlocutory injunction prohibiting the defendant from selling grey goods in Canada.  Specifically, the defendant was enjoined from using labels falsely identifying it as the exclusive manufacturer of certain imported … Continue reading

Canadian Intellectual Property Office Further Extends Deadlines to July 6, 2020

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) has announced a further extension of deadlines to July 6, 2020. All statutory deadlines under the Patent Act, the Trademarks Act, and the Industrial Design Act falling between March 16, 2020 and July 3, 2020 are now automatically extended to July 6, 2020 as a result of the ongoing … Continue reading

Canadian Intellectual Property Office Further Extends Statutory Deadlines to June 15, 2020

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) announced that it has further extended deadlines to June 15, 2020. In order to reduce the impact of COVID-19 and ensure intellectual property owners are not prejudiced by the pandemic, CIPO has further extended deadlines under the Patent Act, the Trademarks Act and the Industrial Design Act to June … Continue reading

Canadian Intellectual Property Office Further Extends Statutory Deadlines to June 1, 2020

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) has announced a further extension of deadlines to June 1, 2020. CIPO is working hard to continue operations as usual in these unforeseen circumstances. To ensure Canadian intellectual property owners do not have their rights compromised by the Covid-19 pandemic, CIPO has extended statutory deadlines that fall between March 16 … Continue reading

Canadian Court Openings Begin – Closure Updates May 1

Please see our updated version of this article, published July 10, 2020. As a further update to our post earlier this week, the Federal Court and British Columbia Supreme Court issued updated notices, and Quebec has extended its declaration of a state of health emergency until May 6, 2020. We will continue to provide updates … Continue reading

Federal Court of Canada Further Extends Suspension Period But Remains Ready for Action(s)

The Federal Court of Canada has just issued a new Practice Direction and Order (COVID-19): Update #2 (April 29, 2020).  The April 29 Practice Direction amends the Court’s previous Updated Practice Direction and Order (COVID-19), dated April 4, 2020. The April 29 Practice Direction confirms that, subject to certain exceptions, no hearings will be held until June … Continue reading

Canadian Intellectual Property Office further extends deadlines to May 18, 2020

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) announced today that it has further extended deadlines under the Patent Act, the Trademarks Act and the Industrial Design Act to May 18, 2020. While Canadian intellectual property owners should always consult with their professional advisors concerning specific deadlines, the general effect of CIPO’s designation means that deadlines falling … Continue reading

Court Suspensions Continue, with Some Exceptions

Please see our updated version of this article, published July 10, 2020. An Update on the Response from Canadian Courts to COVID-19 We are now more than a month in to social distancing measures, and it is time for an update on the status of the courts across Canada. As with the rest of us, … Continue reading

Canadian Courts Can Act Swiftly to Stop Trademark Infringement and False Advertising

Canadian courts have demonstrated their intention, and ability, to continue to dispense justice despite the pandemic. Adaptability has always been a recognized strength of the common law. In many cases, particularly those involving trademark infringement and false advertising, time is of the essence.   There is every reason to expect that justice will continue to be … Continue reading

Federal Court of Canada Extends Suspension Period to May 15, 2020

By Updated Practice Direction and Order dated April 4, 2020, the Federal Court has further extended the Suspension Period to May 15, 2020.  It has simultaneously mapped out a strategy to keep the Court running as efficiently as possible under the circumstances. During the Suspension Period (which began March 16, 2020 and currently runs until May … Continue reading

Canadian Federal Court of Appeal Extends Suspension of Hearings to May 15, 2020

In a Notice to the Parties and the Profession issued April 2, 2020, the Federal Court of Appeal has confirmed that the suspension period implemented on March 16, 2020 will be extended to Friday, May 15, 2020.  All matters scheduled to be heard during this Suspension Period are adjourned. The business of the Court will … Continue reading

UPDATE: Canadian Intellectual Property Office further extends all deadlines to May 1st

In response to the continuing disruption caused by the COVID-19 outbreak,  the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) has announced on March 27, 2020 a further extension for filing deadlines  – all deadlines ending in the month of April 2020 will automatically be extended to May 1, 2020. Parties in proceedings before the Trademarks Opposition Board should … Continue reading

Response from Canadian Courts to COVID-19

Please see our updated version of this article, published July 10, 2020. We know you have a lot to think about and plan right now and over the next few weeks. You can rely on us to keep your intellectual property litigation matters  moving forward.  To that end, we wanted to provide an update on … Continue reading

Unauthorized Reproduction of Online Content Proves Costly

Earlier this year, the Federal Court awarded damages of $20 million for the unauthorized reproduction of obituaries online. That decision, Thomson v. Afterlife Network Inc., 2019 FC 545, demonstrates that severe penalties are available against online operators who infringe copyright for commercial purposes. Background Afterlife, an online website that reproduces obituaries, launched in 2017. Afterlife reproduced over … Continue reading

Unauthorized invoices – Canadian trademark owners beware

Canadians trademark owners are being targeted with misleading fee and renewal notices. As discussed previously, this is not a new phenomenon, but is one we are seeing with increasing incidence. These seemingly official invoices have caused some to pay exorbitant fees to private companies in the mistaken belief that they are paying fees required by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO).… Continue reading
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